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From the Headmaster - The Educational Landscape and Knox Strategic Direction 2018-2022

10-Sep-2018

Members of the School Executive addressed the Knox Parents’ Association on Tuesday 4 September, providing an overview of the School’s vision, goals and strategy.

For many months, the Executive and School Council have been focussed on the changing nature of education and developing a vision that will ensure we make education relevant for our students. We have worked to write and finalise a new Strategic Direction to chart the course of Knox Grammar School, focussing on how we can help students not only survive the challenges of an increasingly uncertain future, but to thrive.

Knox Grammar School Strategic Direction 2018-2022 Knox Grammar School Strategic Direction 2018-2022 (2942 KB)


Significantly, we have made the decision to add Courage to our core values of Faith, Wisdom, Integrity and Compassion. Courage, and being courageous, underpins all aspects of our vision for Knox Grammar School. I have previously stated that I want our students to have strength of character and confidence in doing what is right, as well as the courage to embrace challenge and change.



I also believe that a school cannot approach prominence or intergenerational sustainability without the risk-taking and courageous actions of its leaders.

Recently I received an independent whitepaper examining the current state and the future opportunities and challenges for the education sector. Thoughts and opinions relating to the reshaping of the current model of schooling in favour of a more modern and individual approach is explored in the paper. 



Unquestionably, a substantial number of comparable reports focus on working towards a more modern and individual approach to education.

One important question raised in the whitepaper centres on what students of today need to learn to get a job tomorrow? Most educators agree that knowledge won’t be enough, and tomorrow’s workers will need to learn how to be curious, independent, creative, willing to take risks, learn from failure – and to learn for life.

“The HSC is basically a way to easily select particular students. But does it prepare them for University? And what about after that? So, for me, the biggest challenge in education is asking: what if education, especially higher education, was a transformative experience enabling a broader range of students to reach their full potential?”

Professor Sherman Young
Pro Vice-Chancellor, Learning and Teaching,
Macquarie University (Canon; The Future of Education)



It is obvious that education systems cannot remain the same. We do need to ensure that our students have a breadth of skills and develop deep knowledge and understanding that can be applied beyond school. However, we need to prepare young people to face confidently an unpredictable future with courage, compassion, agency and a growth mindset.

Schools will play a crucial role in providing opportunities for young people to critically examine global developments that are significant to both the world at large and to their own lives. They will teach students how to critically, effectively and responsibly use digital information and social media platforms. 



Schools will encourage intercultural sensitivity and respect by allowing students to engage in experiences that foster an appreciation for diverse peoples, languages and cultures. Schools are also uniquely positioned to enhance young people’s ability to understand their place in the community and the world, and improve their ability to make judgements and take action.



As a School and community, we are absolutely committed to innovation, wellbeing and academic excellence in the education of our students. We are more committed than ever to prepare them for the future.

Mr Scott James
Headmaster